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Thread: Adrian's Custom Corner

  1. #16
    Converted Plastic Modeller A Retired Hangar Mechanic Gavin Miller's Avatar
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    Just came upon this thread. Wow, some great customs there Adrian! ... and fantastic to see them displayed in an LHR setting!

    Gavin

  2. #17
    Converted Plastic Modeller A Retired Hangar Mechanic Gavin Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 701 View Post
    Well done Adrian. Can Ray "downsize" all his decals to 1/400 ? Quite a few I would be interested in.
    Peter, why not reduce the decals yourself? I've bought 1/200 and 1/144 scale decal sheets I needed in 1/400, scanned them in on my office copier and then reduced the artwork in Photoshop. At this stage I have also tweaked them a bit, sharpening up small details and resizing elements that have disappeared in the reduction. Then I print them out onto clear or white decal paper, clear coat and apply as normal.

    A lot cheaper than asking for custom sheets to be made up for you.

    Gavin

  3. #18
    Sydney Aviation Model Show - Event Manager Supreme Hangar Mechanic CEDAR JET's Avatar
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    I so want that MEA comet!!!!!!



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  4. #19
    Senior Member Senior Hangar Mechanic
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    lovely models, and of course, lovely Heathrow airport diorama in the back...I am also tempted to get a 1:200 Bac 1-11 done in BUA, mustad and blue scheme,...you can buy them in diecast, you knew that already....guess I'll get in touch with the fellow selling them,...

  5. #20
    Cadet Trainee Regular Hangar Mechanic jenole's Avatar
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    Adrian.
    On the TwoSix site I notice they have decals for the SAS Viscount 700 in 1:144. As this model is not available in 1:400, I would like to make my own. What Viscount do you suggest as host for this mod, and how do I go about removing old markings on the host.

    best regards Ole
    ole b

  6. #21
    Diecast Quality Inspector Pro Collector Adrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenole View Post
    Adrian.
    On the TwoSix site I notice they have decals for the SAS Viscount 700 in 1:144. As this model is not available in 1:400, I would like to make my own. What Viscount do you suggest as host for this mod, and how do I go about removing old markings on the host.

    best regards Ole
    The only choices are one of the two Aeroclassics Viscount 700s in BOAC, or Bahamas Airways colours as those are the only two Viscount 700s released that have silver wings/belly. The others are either 800 series or have grey wings/belly so that would give you more work.
    Adrian

    The missing B.707s still needed to be done: Uganda Airlines, MEA -Q-Jet, PIA -final, TMA of Lebanon (with correct Lemon colour tail)

    DC-8s still needed to be done: UAT, Iberia ('80s scheme), Air Ceylon, Air Spain, Seaboard World (-63)

    Caravelles still needed to be made: Luxair, Air Algerie, Sabena (final 'S' logo scheme}, SAS 'SCANDINAVIAN' late '60s scheme; Libyan Arab Airlines

  7. #22
    Cadet Trainee Regular Hangar Mechanic jenole's Avatar
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    Thanks Adrian.
    What should I use to remove the BOAC/Bahamas decals ?
    ole b

  8. #23
    Diecast Quality Inspector Pro Collector Adrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenole View Post
    Thanks Adrian.
    What should I use to remove the BOAC/Bahamas decals ?
    Acetone(nail varnish remover) with a cotton bud. However, these two Viscounts have a very thick dark blue cheatline and it may end up in a mess.
    Acetone will dissolve the tampo printing and is good for removing lettering and small items where the cotton bud can absorb the print, but for cheatlines, I would carefully overpaint them with a acrylic white paint(Tamiya is the best). I would also repaint the dark blue tail white also, as this is too much ink for a cotton bud to absorb in one go. If you are using lazer-printed decals, they have to be applied to a white background anyway, or the colour below will show through. Good luck!
    Adrian

    The missing B.707s still needed to be done: Uganda Airlines, MEA -Q-Jet, PIA -final, TMA of Lebanon (with correct Lemon colour tail)

    DC-8s still needed to be done: UAT, Iberia ('80s scheme), Air Ceylon, Air Spain, Seaboard World (-63)

    Caravelles still needed to be made: Luxair, Air Algerie, Sabena (final 'S' logo scheme}, SAS 'SCANDINAVIAN' late '60s scheme; Libyan Arab Airlines

  9. #24
    Cadet Trainee Regular Hangar Mechanic jenole's Avatar
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    Thanks again Adrian. I'll make my orders for model and decals and have a go at it.
    ole b

  10. #25
    Diecast Quality Inspector Pro Collector Adrian's Avatar
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    Time for another customised model....the VC10 RB211 engine testbed.

    Construction number 829 was built for the Royal Air Force as the fifth example of a type 1106 VC10. These type 1106s can be described as 'hot-rods', as they combine the Super wing and the more powerful RCo.43 engines with the original length 'Standard' fuselage and therefore they did not trade performance for capacity as the Super VC10 did. XR809 flew for three years with RAF 10 squadron named 'Hugh Malcolm VC' but for some unexplained reason the RAF felt able to lease the aircraft to Rolls-Royce as a flying test bed for the RB211 turbofan engine.
    At that time no aircraft was available that could accommodate the large girth of the RB211 beneath the wing and still have some ground clearance left, the mounting on the side of the fuselage of the VC10 did provide this clearance. Also with the clean wing and relatively high fuselage mounting the RB211 was in clean air and therefore the test results would be universally acceptable. To be able to attach the RB211 the engine beam was strengthened to accommodate the higher weight and aerodynamic effects of the larger frontal area. Also as the RB211 was designed for a pylon mounting some other modifications were needed to adapt to the side-mounted VC10 pylon. All went well and on the first flight of the three-engined VC10 took place on 6th May 1970. On take-off, the two starboard Conways were marginally more powerful than the one RB211.
    Reregistered as G-AXLR the aircraft commenced on an extensive flight test programme. Initially it flew from Hucknall, but from May 1972 on the aircraft was based at Filton from which many more flights were made. One hair-raising flight was the test bed's 44th flight on 7th august 1974. The thrust reverser on the RB211 was not used at this point but for some reason the reverser sleeve was not positively locked in the forward position. With an expected flight time of six hours the aircraft took off laden with fuel. An incremental climb was carried out, pausing every so often for re-lights on the RB211. Following a re-light with the aircraft flying at 240 knots at 20,000 feet, the cold stream reverser of the RB211 slid back into the reverse position, sealing off the bypass duct. The effect of this was a reverse idle which produced a slight lurch on the aircraft. Shortly afterwards, a more violent lurch occurred, followed by aircraft buffet. There was adverse yaw and roll, and level flight could not be maintained with full power on the Conways. The aircraft began descending at 2,500 feet per minute and, as the crew had no control over the reverse selection, the RB211 was shut down. This slowed the rate of descent but the aircraft was still descending at about 1,500 feet per minute.
    Fuel jettison was initiated as the equation was quite clear to all on board - the aircraft would hit the ground in approximately twelve minutes unless the weight could be brought down to a value that the Conways could cope with. In such circumstances the time that the Conways can spend on take-off rating become academic. At 1,000 feet the aircraft weight was low enough to enable level flight on the thrust available, and a safe landing was eventually made. After this modifications were carried out to the reverser to ensure a more positive locking system.
    On 26th September 1975 the aircraft was delivered to RAF Kemble. Initially the aircraft would return to RAF service but it was found that the airframe was distorted, and repairs were deemed too costly. In the end the airframe was used for SAS training purposes and was left to decay at the site, eventually being scrapped.


    When later on Rolls-Royce needed to flight test the RB211-535CF and RB211-535E variants the Boeing 'house' 747 had to be hired for two 30 hour demonstrations at a total cost that just fell short of $10 million.

    The model

    The donor model is the diecast 1/1400 scale Gemini Jets Vickers VC10, XR808 in Royal Air Force Air Support Command colours (any of the Jet-X ‘white top’ RAF VC10s would also do),
    1) With a cotton bud soaked in Acetone (nail varnish remover) carefully wipe off the roof titles “ROYAL AIR FORCE AIR SUPPORT COMMAND”. Also the RAF roundels on fuselage and wings and RAF fin flash on the tail fin. Finally remove all the serial numbers (on engines and under wings). This may take several cotton buds to absorb the ink removed. Be careful not to remove the ‘RAF scroll name’ on the port side by the cockpit, as this remained on the aircraft.
    2) Carefully pull out the port side engines from their sockets (they should come out easily)
    3) Test-fit the replacement RB211 engine to see if it fits in the open socket. If not, a little gently sanding of the pylon mount may be necessary. ‘Superglue’ the RB211 engine in the socket, using the photos for correct alignment.
    4) Paint the new engine silver and shade to match photos as required.
    5) Add camera pod under inner starboard wing from scrap to match photos.
    6) Paint the tip of the tail ‘bullet’ fairing dayglo red as shown in the photos.
    7) Apply decals – new roof titles, serial underneath port wing and on tail as in photos.


    Adrian

    The missing B.707s still needed to be done: Uganda Airlines, MEA -Q-Jet, PIA -final, TMA of Lebanon (with correct Lemon colour tail)

    DC-8s still needed to be done: UAT, Iberia ('80s scheme), Air Ceylon, Air Spain, Seaboard World (-63)

    Caravelles still needed to be made: Luxair, Air Algerie, Sabena (final 'S' logo scheme}, SAS 'SCANDINAVIAN' late '60s scheme; Libyan Arab Airlines

  11. #26
    Senior Member A Retired Hangar Mechanic PRESTWICK PIONEER's Avatar
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    Feck me that has turned out so well. Ive just woken up. That is way your best custom so far! Sterling job, Adrian.

  12. #27
    ba777-236
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    Adrian, amazing job!!

  13. #28
    Master Yoda Hangar Trainee backfire's Avatar
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    AAA OK!!
    Sal
    Honorary Aussie Too




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  14. #29
    Diecast Quality Inspector Pro Collector Adrian's Avatar
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    If anyone wants to have a go at this, I have some spare resin RB211 engines available for the conversion.
    Adrian

    The missing B.707s still needed to be done: Uganda Airlines, MEA -Q-Jet, PIA -final, TMA of Lebanon (with correct Lemon colour tail)

    DC-8s still needed to be done: UAT, Iberia ('80s scheme), Air Ceylon, Air Spain, Seaboard World (-63)

    Caravelles still needed to be made: Luxair, Air Algerie, Sabena (final 'S' logo scheme}, SAS 'SCANDINAVIAN' late '60s scheme; Libyan Arab Airlines

  15. #30
    Diecast Quality Inspector Pro Collector Adrian's Avatar
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    An Arab, a Paddy and a Paki

    Time for three more custom models to go on my Heathrow period layout.
    Having done a MEA Comet 4C, I also wanted one in United Arab Airlines colours. Formerly called Misrair, UAA was the flag carrier of Egypt and the airline was later renamed Egyptair which flies today. Here is SU-ALC which was the airline's first Comet 4C delivered in 1960. The model was a BOAC/Kuwait Airways Comet 4 and was customised using scaled down Two-Six decals.(note even the wingtip tanks have the correct 'UAA' logo on the port tank and in Arabic on the starboard tank!)

    Next up is a DC-7C(F) of Aer Turas, Irish Independent Airlines. This was a charter cargo carrier that started with DC-3s in the early 1960s and progressed to two DC-4s(initially leased from Alitalia and then bought), two Bristol 170 Freighters, followed by two DC-7C freighters that were bought from KLM (note adaptation of the latter's livery!).The airline then had a Canadair CL-44 and finally a DC-8-63 before ceasing operations. They operated from Dublin and Shannon to points throughout Europe and all main UK airports often transporting Irish race horses. The model is an Aeroclassic BOAC white-tail DC-7C with downsized Two-Six decals.

    The final model is a 'retro of a retro' - a PIA L-1049H Super Constellation that has been repainted into its 1950s livery, as issued on the AC Gen 1 decalled PIA Super Connie. The current Aeroclassics model is in the 1960s PIA livery and I thought it might be rather nice to have an earlier-liveried one also. Decals are Silver Fox 1/144th scale decals down-sized to 1/400th.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Adrian

    The missing B.707s still needed to be done: Uganda Airlines, MEA -Q-Jet, PIA -final, TMA of Lebanon (with correct Lemon colour tail)

    DC-8s still needed to be done: UAT, Iberia ('80s scheme), Air Ceylon, Air Spain, Seaboard World (-63)

    Caravelles still needed to be made: Luxair, Air Algerie, Sabena (final 'S' logo scheme}, SAS 'SCANDINAVIAN' late '60s scheme; Libyan Arab Airlines

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